Bookie PyCon 2012 Sprint Report

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Sprint like mad!

So PyCon sprints, what can you say? You go, you hack…and hack…and some some point you take a break for a beverage…and hack some more.

Last year I got the real movement behind Bookie. So this really marks the one year anniversary for Bookie. I’ve had it as a side project to hack on in my spare time for the last whole year. In that time, honestly it’s not crazy different from where it started. However, it’s gone through multiple JS rewrites, two different UI designs, and a whole lot more. I’ve really learned a lot about development, testing, and making some hard choices over the last year. I hope by this time next year I’ll have announced Bookie on some big site (reddit/hacker news?) and survived.

This sprint though wasn’t the time. So what did I get done?

tl;dr

Bookie got improvements

  • Better JS tests
  • Better PY tests
  • Start of HTML5 history
  • Invite system
  • Threaded content fetcher
  • Start of celery background runner

First, I started out by working on getting the html5 history stuff going. It’s not perfect yet, but it’s started and I really realized I needed to have a better way to do JS tests, so…

Next I redid the JS tests. I don’t want to have to fire up the application in order to run my JS tests. I also don’t want to have to hit the database and such. This means I had to change the API tests. Rather than making real requests/responses, I test that the classes build the right type of requests. I verify the url, data payload, etc are correct.

Once the JS tests were redone, I realized that I hated how I had yXXX.js as the filenames and redid those as well. While I was cleaning up I dumped a bunch of old code we no longer needed. Basically tons of gardening cleaning out the weeds.

With that out of the way, the next day of sprints was all about getting an invite system underway. I originally wanted to do a throttled signup process, so anyone could sign up, but then I realized that really, invites will work better. The people using Bookie now will know who’d be interested in testing and if someone really wants to get in, they’ll contact me in some fashion.

With that up, I got to spend the next day fixing bugs in everything. Wheeee! What was cool was that I managed to get a few people at the sprints curious about Bookie and testing things out. Nothing exposes bugs like new users. During this process I spent some time cleaning house on the Python side of things and making tests easier to run/write.

Finally, I’ve started work on the background processing using Celery. I’ve got a big hurdle in that, but my cron’d stats processes are working and I’ve almost got imports running as out of process celery children. That should really help with new users. You know at some point they’ll come flooding in right? :-)

Overall, while I didn’t get a ton of new user facing features going, I did a TON of clean up and maintenance. As one person expressed “Wow, there’s a lot more in here than I expected when you said it was a bookmark application”. Bookie has really grown over the last year and she needs me to spend some time giving things some love before moving forward too fast. The sprints really gave me a chance to do that, all while hanging out and chatting with really smart people. What more can I ask for?

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